Gallery - 2015 Demos
© Sheffield Woodturning Club 2015
Sheffield Woodturning Club
Gallery  - Club Demonstrations 2015
9th April Steve Heeley Textured and coloured vase Examples of Skew chisel work: Chair leg and Spurtle
Textured with several passes of Proxxon angle grinder then coloured with patches of red acrylic paint, black paint spray all over and sanded back Example of skew chisel work using a 3/8th inch square parting and beading tool Example of skew chisel work using using a 3/8th inch square parting and beading tool
14th May 2015 Club Members Demonstration Brian Munsey turned a natural edge bowl from burr ash Rick Dobney turned a coloured and gilded tea light holder
Brian left the rough texture around the bowl as he commented that is what people prefer Turned, wire brushed to open grain then spirit dye (sprayed on) and gilt wax rubbed into the grain with wax finish
16th May 2015 Simon Hope all day demonstration Simon’s brilliant demonstrationsof 6 different pieces with a wide range of techniques and ideas had everyone’s full attention Note: Full details, with photographs, on making the whistle and salt shaker can be found on the Cheam Woodturners website Members can request plans for the tape measure holder and the whistle from Lesley. A few items Simon used were the PREVAL spray system, Carn Metals for top pouring grade lead free pewter, Pewter Patina (e-bay), Waxed hemp – black/yellow
The centre sphere was turned first using a swept back spindle gouge, cleaning it up with a half inch skew and long strips of sandpaper. The top was sized at one third less than the base and turned at high speed. The textured snake effect createded with a Proxxon grinder using a King Arthur head (available from Tool Post) to cut our random small scallops. 3M buffing discs used for defluffing. Black boot polish was used to colour the textured part Plans for this piece can be obtained from Lesley by members Pewter decoration poured into bone dry wood then turned separately then decorated with black patina and textured through the patina Plans for this piece can be obtained by members from Lesley Waxed hemp was used to secure the push fit
11th June 2015 Paul Jones  Beaded and coloured vase Examples of Skew chisel work: Dibber and Honey Dipper Paul recommended EEE-Ultra Shine plus Shellawax Cream for polishing his pieces
This slightly abrasive wax is applied first to the piece - no sanding sealer used This is applied to the piece following the Ultra Shine for the final polish
9th July 2015 Sue R Evans Automata Sue gave a fascinating and enthusiastic talk about her approach to creating the automata she makes, allowing the wood to ‘speak to her’, she particularly likes using driftwood and recycles wherever possible. She finds inspiration from quotations and elsewhere. Her work is exhibited through the UK.
13th August 2015 Andrew Hall Small hat boiled & baked, Corinthian helmet As ever Andrew gave a fascinating and novel approach to his specialist subject of hat making. He recommended using wood within 3-4 weeks of the tree being cut down for the best bend on a hat brim. Other recommendations included Aldi eyewear cleaning wipes;  an Elipse face/dust mask which and costs under £15 + P&P from ProtectiveMasksDirect; Rexel wax coloured pencils for colouring the hat bands and Woodart Products website for magnetic lights. The small hat was turned and then ‘boiled’ in a pressure cooker, it was then placed in a jig to bend the rim and dried under a set of Ikea lamps.Andrew had a template for cutting out the eyeholes in the corinthian helmets, which were mounted on display bases of the same wood. He used a proxxon jigsaw to cut out the shapes.He generously donated the pieces he had made for a future club raffle.
10th September Sue Harker Bud Vase, Tealightholder, Bangle Sue returned to give us yet another different and interesting set of demonstrations, despite her recent injuries, starting with her take on a bud vase consisting of a hollowed out bowl blank with a decorated centre. The centre was decorated with Jo Sonja’s carbon black overlaid with gold both mixed with flow medium to make them go further and dry more slowly, a sgraffito type pattern was applied with a Kemper rubber texture comb. She then used the centre removed from the bowl blank to make a tealight holder. Her 3rd piece was a spalted beech bangle. Throughout the demo Sue offered useful tips and hints including using a ground down spindle gouge as a wide beading tool and for the bangle - holding her work on the chuck by taping it to the chuck itself when parting off the outside from the centre.  The bowl blank centre was also held together with masking tape while parting it off. Her final tip was to decant her melamine lacquer and other liquids into small washing up bottles, preventing spillage
Decorated with gold and black scraffito held on lathe to decorate Made from the centre removed from the bud vase made from cut down spindle gouge carved, painted red and overbrushed black black painted and carved
8th October Margaret Garrard Hollow Bud Vase, Decorated platter  Margaret made a welcome return with apparently simple looking pieces using some interesting techniques for turning and holding.She made a bud vase that was hollowed out, firstly by drilling from the top then turning round and hollowing out the inside from the bottom, having created a plug that would match the grain when inserted and glued in place. She had spigots on each end and to finish the bottom of the vase held it in a home made adjustable jam chuck (shown) with 4 cuts and a jubilee clip to tighten it.  This chuck could be made to any size and there was a much smaller one used to hold small spoons. The base is decorated with a couple of line which disguise the join with the plug.Margaret’s 2nd piece was a decorated ogee platter with a beaded rim.  She turned the ogee shaped underside, making sure the foot was the right size for the platter then having turned the top, she decorated the flat edge by using the tip of a pointed spindle gouge, creating mini coves with spaces between. Turning the platter round to finish the base it was held against the shaped mandrel and lined with plain paper as patterned paper and mats can transfer the pattern to the wood.
Using adjustable jam chuck with jubilee clip Coloured with brown paint, verdigris wax and gold paste
12 November Rick Dobney (club member) Hollow vase, Off centre turning This was Rick’s 2nd demo at the club, having attended the AWGB teaching course he is keen to expand this activity and would be grateful for constructive feedback on the evening. He started with a hollow vase, which is made in two parts and joined, with burn line decoration to disguise the join. He ably demonstrated the techniques he uses inside and out. He mainly used a spindle gouge with an arcing cut to remove the interior material. The vase was finished with sanding sealer and carnauba wax. The 2nd part of the evening was a fascinating demo of Rick’s own patented off-centre turning jig, made from polyethylene, allowing a lot of flexibility in placing the wood without having to drill holes in the back to mount on a faceplate. Rick marked up the piece with the range possible for placing the block and then at very slow speed (300 rpm seems to be an optimum speed) turned various diameter circles, mainly using a spindle gouge, he finds a v-cut easier to control. It is essential to use a very light touch and sharp tools. The piece was textured with a Proxxon mini grinder and air-brushed to colour the piece, firstly with black, then sanded back and coloured again with red wood stain. Rick cleverly used some damage to the wood as a ‘design opportunity’! Given the time constraints and the complexity of the task Rick produced a very impressive piece of work.
10 December Tony Wilson Chips & Dips off centre bowl, cake stand, post box Tony gave us his usual professional, no-nonsense, demo.  He included a number of very useful tips and produced three interesting items.  The first was a “collapsible” cake stand, based on a cone and two or three turned tiers with appropriately sized holes.  The second was an off centre bowl with a wide rim for “chips and dips”, and the third was a “letter box money box”.  He took none of them to a finish but the end results were nevertheless impressive.  During the course of the evening Tony raised £81 for Help for Heroes – in particular the workshop he helps organise at Catterick Garrison.
© Sheffield Woodturning Club 2015
designed by Hilary Sinclair
Gallery - 2015 demos
 
Sheffield Woodturning Club
Gallery  - Club Demonstrations 2015
9th April Steve Heeley Textured and coloured vase Examples of Skew chisel work: Chair leg and Spurtle
Textured with several passes of Proxxon angle grinder then coloured with patches of red acrylic paint, black paint spray all over and sanded back Example of skew chisel work using a 3/8th inch square parting and beading tool Example of skew chisel work using using a 3/8th inch square parting and beading tool
14th May 2015 Club Members Demonstration Brian Munsey turned a natural edge bowl from burr ash Rick Dobney turned a coloured and gilded tea light holder
Brian left the rough texture around the bowl as he commented that is what people prefer Turned, wire brushed to open grain then spirit dye (sprayed on) and gilt wax rubbed into the grain with wax finish
16th May 2015 Simon Hope all day demonstration Simon’s brilliant demonstrationsof 6 different pieces with a wide range of techniques and ideas had everyone’s full attention Note: Full details, with photographs, on making the whistle and salt shaker can be found on the Cheam Woodturners website Members can request plans for the tape measure holder and the whistle from Lesley. A few items Simon used were the PREVAL spray system, Carn Metals for top pouring grade lead free pewter, Pewter Patina (e-bay), Waxed hemp – black/yellow
The centre sphere was turned first using a swept back spindle gouge, cleaning it up with a half inch skew and long strips of sandpaper. The top was sized at one third less than the base and turned at high speed. The textured snake effect createded with a Proxxon grinder using a King Arthur head (available from Tool Post) to cut our random small scallops. 3M buffing discs used for defluffing. Black boot polish was used to colour the textured part Plans for this piece can be obtained from Lesley by members Pewter decoration poured into bone dry wood then turned separately then decorated with black patina and textured through the patina Plans for this piece can be obtained by members from Lesley Waxed hemp was used to secure the push fit
11th June 2015 Paul Jones  Beaded and coloured vase Examples of Skew chisel work: Dibber and Honey Dipper Paul recommended EEE-Ultra Shine plus Shellawax Cream for polishing his pieces
This slightly abrasive wax is applied first to the piece - no sanding sealer used This is applied to the piece following the Ultra Shine for the final polish
9th July 2015 Sue R Evans Automata Sue gave a fascinating and enthusiastic talk about her approach to creating the automata she makes, allowing the wood to ‘speak to her’, she particularly likes using driftwood and recycles wherever possible. She finds inspiration from quotations and elsewhere. Her work is exhibited through the UK.
13th August 2015 Andrew Hall Small hat boiled & baked, Corinthian helmet As ever Andrew gave a fascinating and novel approach to his specialist subject of hat making. He recommended using wood within 3-4 weeks of the tree being cut down for the best bend on a hat brim. Other recommendations included Aldi eyewear cleaning wipes;  an Elipse face/dust mask which and costs under £15 + P&P from ProtectiveMasksDirect; Rexel wax coloured pencils for colouring the hat bands and Woodart Products website for magnetic lights. The small hat was turned and then ‘boiled’ in a pressure cooker, it was then placed in a jig to bend the rim and dried under a set of Ikea lamps.Andrew had a template for cutting out the eyeholes in the corinthian helmets, which were mounted on display bases of the same wood. He used a proxxon jigsaw to cut out the shapes.He generously donated the pieces he had made for a future club raffle.
10th September Sue Harker Bud Vase, Tealightholder, Bangle Sue returned to give us yet another different and interesting set of demonstrations, despite her recent injuries, starting with her take on a bud vase consisting of a hollowed out bowl blank with a decorated centre. The centre was decorated with Jo Sonja’s carbon black overlaid with gold both mixed with flow medium to make them go further and dry more slowly, a sgraffito type pattern was applied with a Kemper rubber texture comb. She then used the centre removed from the bowl blank to make a tealight holder. Her 3rd piece was a spalted beech bangle. Throughout the demo Sue offered useful tips and hints including using a ground down spindle gouge as a wide beading tool and for the bangle - holding her work on the chuck by taping it to the chuck itself when parting off the outside from the centre.  The bowl blank centre was also held together with masking tape while parting it off. Her final tip was to decant her melamine lacquer and other liquids into small washing up bottles, preventing spillage
Decorated with gold and black scraffito held on lathe to decorate Made from the centre removed from the bud vase made from cut down spindle gouge carved, painted red and overbrushed black black painted and carved
8th October Margaret Garrard Hollow Bud Vase, Decorated platter  Margaret made a welcome return with apparently simple looking pieces using some interesting techniques for turning and holding.She made a bud vase that was hollowed out, firstly by drilling from the top then turning round and hollowing out the inside from the bottom, having created a plug that would match the grain when inserted and glued in place. She had spigots on each end and to finish the bottom of the vase held it in a home made adjustable jam chuck (shown) with 4 cuts and a jubilee clip to tighten it.  This chuck could be made to any size and there was a much smaller one used to hold small spoons. The base is decorated with a couple of line which disguise the join with the plug.Margaret’s 2nd piece was a decorated ogee platter with a beaded rim.  She turned the ogee shaped underside, making sure the foot was the right size for the platter then having turned the top, she decorated the flat edge by using the tip of a pointed spindle gouge, creating mini coves with spaces between. Turning the platter round to finish the base it was held against the shaped mandrel and lined with plain paper as patterned paper and mats can transfer the pattern to the wood.
Using adjustable jam chuck with jubilee clip Coloured with brown paint, verdigris wax and gold paste
12 November Rick Dobney (club member) Hollow vase, Off centre turning This was Rick’s 2nd demo at the club, having attended the AWGB teaching course he is keen to expand this activity and would be grateful for constructive feedback on the evening. He started with a hollow vase, which is made in two parts and joined, with burn line decoration to disguise the join. He ably demonstrated the techniques he uses inside and out. He mainly used a spindle gouge with an arcing cut to remove the interior material. The vase was finished with sanding sealer and carnauba wax. The 2nd part of the evening was a fascinating demo of Rick’s own patented off-centre turning jig, made from polyethylene, allowing a lot of flexibility in placing the wood without having to drill holes in the back to mount on a faceplate. Rick marked up the piece with the range possible for placing the block and then at very slow speed (300 rpm seems to be an optimum speed) turned various diameter circles, mainly using a spindle gouge, he finds a v-cut easier to control. It is essential to use a very light touch and sharp tools. The piece was textured with a Proxxon mini grinder and air-brushed to colour the piece, firstly with black, then sanded back and coloured again with red wood stain. Rick cleverly used some damage to the wood as a ‘design opportunity’! Given the time constraints and the complexity of the task Rick produced a very impressive piece of work.
10 December Tony Wilson Chips & Dips off centre bowl, cake stand, post box Tony gave us his usual professional, no-nonsense, demo.  He included a number of very useful tips and produced three interesting items.  The first was a “collapsible” cake stand, based on a cone and two or three turned tiers with appropriately sized holes.  The second was an off centre bowl with a wide rim for “chips and dips”, and the third was a “letter box money box”.  He took none of them to a finish but the end results were nevertheless impressive.  During the course of the evening Tony raised £81 for Help for Heroes – in particular the workshop he helps organise at Catterick Garrison.